(Reblogged from workin-them-clockwork-angels)

elimin8theimpossible:

cricsyxo:

divinedorothy:

egotastical:

divinedorothy:

bisexual people aren’t more likely to cheat in relationships but we are more likely to cheat at cards, while lesbians are most likely to cheat at jenga, and genderqueer people often cheat at mario kart

how the fuck do you cheat at jenga

ask a lesbian

image

this is never not funny

(Reblogged from craveurbrains)
(Reblogged from dailyanarchist)

nprfreshair:

FXX is going to have a 12-day Simpsons marathon, playing all 552 episodes.  In appreciation of the series, we’ve compiled several of our Simpsons interviews into one show. 

Since The Simpsons began, Fresh Air’s Terry Gross has interviewed many people who have had a hand creating the show – from Matt Groening in 1989 and 2003 to  two of the writers Al Jean and Mike Reiss in 1992. Gross also talked with actors who do the voices, including Nancy Cartwright, who plays Bart, in 2007; Julie Kavner, the voice of Marge in 1994; Hank Azaria, the voice of Moe, Apu, Chief Wiggum and others in 2004.

Here, Simpsons creator Matt Groening tells Terry about how they occasionally got in trouble with the Fox network: 

"At the beginning, virtually anything we did would get somebody upset and now it seems like the people who are eager to be offended — and this country is full of people who are eager to be offended. They’ve given up on our show. We got into trouble a few years ago for — Homer is watching an anti-drinking commercial and it said, "Warning! Beer causes rectal cancer." And Homer responds by saying, "Mmm beer." Fox didn’t want us to do that because beer advertisers are a big part of the Fox empire and it turns out the writer was able to track down the actual fact where some studies show that indeed it does — or did or has a tendency to [cause cancer] — so we were able to keep it in."

Photo: Courtesy of Fox 

(Reblogged from nprfreshair)

thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.

You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.

This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.

Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.

Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.

Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.

It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.

If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue.

Sign the petition, then spread the word.

(Reblogged from laughterkey)
(Reblogged from jewishsanta)

Seattle weather, and what appears to be either snow or hail on the Peaks (at Flagstaff, AZ)

Anyone in need of some midwifery? (at Flagstaff, AZ)

BIG BELLY! (at Flagstaff, AZ)

Flagstaff alley (at Flagstaff, AZ)